The Home Security Scam

Knock, Knock. Who's There?

"Act NOW for a FREE
home security system."

Don't be fooled by promises of FREE. Especially in regards to the security of your home. The scam is relatively simple. The caller offers you a free home security system by just putting a sign outside your home. Or, to get your "free" alarm, you may have to sign a long-term and expensive system monitoring contract.

What You Should Know

Callers may state or imply that they are from your existing security company and that they're there to "upgrade" or "replace" your current security system. Once inside your home, however, they may install a new security system and have you sign papers that include a costly contract for the monitoring service. Or, they may claim your security company has gone out of business. They will then tell you have to buy new equipment and sign new contracts.

How YouMail can help stop home security scams today

YouMail customers are protected from scammers, spammers and other unwanted callers. And it's 100% totally free. Our exceptional call blocking and caller ID capabilities effectively block calls and remove any and all numbers from robocaller lists – FOREVER.

Here are a couple of REAL voicemails
left with YouMail customers.

What you should do

If you get a recorded sales call, but you didn't give the caller written permission to call you, the call is illegal. Don't press 1 to speak to the operator or get your name taken off the list, and don't give any personal information. If you respond, you'll probably get more calls.


Our best advice

Let calls from numbers you don't recognize roll to voicemail. Voicemail is your greatest asset against fraud. YouMail identifies known scam callers. They will hear an "out of service" message and the scammers will take you off their list and move on.
If you're in the market for a home security system, here are a few suggestions (courtesy of the FTC):

  • Get references from your friends, family, neighbors, co-workers and from the company's current clients.
  • Check out the companies online. Read about other people's experiences with the companies. In addition, contact your state Attorney General, local consumer protection agency, and the Better Business Bureau to see if any complaints are on file.
  • Verify that the contractor's licenses are current and in good standing. Check with the National Association of State Contractors Licensing Agencies for the appropriate agency in your state.
  • Get written estimates from several companies, and ask plenty of questions. A reputable company will not try to sell you anything before completing a professional assessment of your needs and the layout of your home
Find out more about the number. Check out YouMail's online phone directory to see if that number has negative reports or belongs to a known scammer.